4 Tips to Proactively Turn Passive Prospects Into Engaged Candidates
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Job seekers have more clout today than perhaps at any time in history. Now is the time to engage prospects early, efficiently, and in a very personalised way; to sell people on everything your company has to offer.

John Ryan provides 4 helpful and useful tips on finding, engaging, and converting great talent into top-notch candidates who choose your company over the competition.

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Experience Can Be A Restrictive Default Setting

Experience can cut the wrong way

Most global executives are promoted or recruited into new leadership roles because of the education they completed, the experience they gained and the insights they bring to new business opportunities and challenges.

Experience alone can be a game-changer. Having learned the ropes once before, successful executives can leverage the lessons learned and confidence instilled in them from past employment, and parlay these assets into exciting new results for their next employer.

On the whole, experience truly is a gift for those who choose to learn - good and bad - from it, and those who learn how they must adapt in order to recognise how different situations, resources and people fit the current day and potential for tomorrow.

Yet experience can also cut the wrong way when an executive leader uses their experience in a past executive role as a crutch for justifying decisions or, worse yet, as a default setting to stifle new ideas and extinguish the flames of innovation that may seem strange, unachievable or simply unfamiliar.

Experience can be a divider

Consider the case of the globally experienced industrial leader who continually reminds his direct reports that, "I've been doing this for 20 years, so believe me when I tell you this is how it should be done."

Over time, this repeated statement rings like a bell of impending disappointment in the ears of those who hear it and, by now, have simply come to expect it whenever the leader doesn't agree with something new. It has become a divisive force within his organisation, yet he remains totally unaware.

In this particular case, experience has become a handicap. It can blind executives to new opportunities and new innovations. And it can also alienate others and polarise the very people he or she needs to mobilise to achieve the company's ambitious growth objectives.

What this particular executive leader fails to recognise is that each executive around the table brings their own unique sets of experience that inform their views, their values and the decisions they make about what's good for the organisation.

In continually reminding everyone of his experience, he unknowingly discounts and devalues theirs. He uses his experience as a bludgeon to cut conversations he doesn't like short and to remind his charges who's really in charge.

Experience, it has been said, can be a tremendous teacher. Yet, in this case, it can also be a divider.

Use your own experience wisely

As you continue to grow your own executive career, be careful not to use your own experience as a defensive shield or as a tool for quieting different opinions in your organisation.

If you play it just right, others will recognise your experience and what you've learned from it without you having to remind them of it.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Working For Your Resume Or Your Eulogy

Sometimes, if you listen intently enough, some of the most powerful lessons of your executive leadership career can come from some of the most unexpected places.

Too often, it seems, global executives tend to look up the chain of command for insight on a host of important management challenges. It's natural, after all, to seek to learn from the experience of more experienced and highly successful leaders for tips on balancing priorities, making sound decisions and taking calculated risks.

Yet some of the most telling and revealing lessons are often revealed where we might least expect it - on the front lines, in the trenches, so to say, and often, in the words of people who've walked distinctly different paths than our own up the corporate ladder.

Take, for example, the words of a schoolteacher who recently challenged some friends to look at little differently at their work, their aspirations and their lives, too.

As the teacher found himself defending his choice of a service-oriented career separate and apart from the upwardly mobile kind of business careers his friends had embarked on, he paused and ask them to think of something he long ago learned.

At some part, no matter how ambitious one may be or how determined to build a high-powered business career or reach the CEO's corner office, he told them, "At some point, you have to make a conscious decision to either live for your resume or for your eulogy."

Those words hit home, and spurred his friends to reflect on the paths they were then invested on in terms of job titles, salaries, and vacation accruals.

You see, while each of us is committed to our organisations, our employees and of course to our own career ambitions, we must take stock of what this commitment may be costing us.

Yes, it appears there is a cost, but it's simply not evident as we pursue the business priorities that tend to consume every working day, and then, each working week, and over time, another year.

The teacher's words struck a chord because many of us, perhaps having achieved some level of the kind of success we only dreamed of earlier in our careers, have already realised that a life lived mostly in business terms may yield terrific financial dividends but seldom delivers the kind of satisfaction we seek for fulfillment in our lives away from work.

For those of us who have already learned that what others most remember about us is how we made them feel, it's time to refresh our resolve to help others along the way toward achieving whatever corporate goals may lie in front of us.

And for those still dripping with ambition or simply too young to have achieved the kind of success than can empower a healthy and financially secure future, we can only wish you the schoolteacher's wisdom, because a life well lived will most certainly be retold in our respective eulogies and the titles we held and salaries we earned will only have mattered to ourselves.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Productivity And Positivity Are Keys To Reaching Your Goals

Economic challenges and lacking corporate resources are enough to frustrate even the best-laid business plans - and the best global leaders.

Yet that reality is nothing new to executives the world over who've faced difficult challenges - perhaps defining or redefining ones - during the course of the last few years as economic uncertainty and challenging environments have combined to reduce management confidence and investment.

It's time to turn the page

To turn the page requires some level of individual renewal deep within each one of us. It calls us to look to the future for the seeds of opportunity and to purposefully and regularly cast out the doubt that has at times paralysed our decision-making process or clouded our view so much as to render any meaningful strategic planning useless.

Global leaders must seize on every single day to find not only their highest and most rewarding calling, but to manage the demands on their time and focus so they can elevate or maintain their own personal productivity at the highest levels possible.

The alchemy of reaching your business and career goals is the combination of that productivity with a healthy measure of optimism and positivity, no matter what the world might throw at us in the months to come.

Productivity and positivity matter

A positive attitude coupled with an enterprising or promising outlook can endear today's global executive to their teams, colleagues and peers. To be the source of positive expressions about the things we can control might well serve others as much as ourselves. If difficulty is inevitable, it's up to the leader to enlist the support of colleagues and friends and explain why it's a test worth the best of every person around us. We can choose to shrink from it, or rise to it.

To do the latter, we must accept our circumstances and commit to improving them, through a combination of hard work, commitment, support for one another in the work environment, and a positive, uplifting attitude that inspires others.

If we can find new ways to be more productive and face new challenges with optimism and confidence, we may just find the pathway to achieving what's next in our organisations and for our careers.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Replacing Fear With Fortitude

The matter of fear

One of the reasons a weekend respite from one's executive leadership responsibilities – or a longer holiday break away from the office – can be so productive for one's state of mind is because it allows us the time to reflect on our work and absorb important lessons learned by others.

There is no shortage of illuminating quotes, allegories and simple epiphanies circulating on the Internet, in social media and in a multitude of books and short stories that provide ample education for those of us willing to learn and absorb to improve ourselves as leaders and people.

Over time, one will recognise that many of these lessons have been shared through centuries of human experience and observation. Whether they come from Plato, Churchill, Lincoln or others whose own leadership journeys have transcended their own time on Earth, there is much to learn and model as we try to lead and inspire others.

Yet there is one particular topic that many of history's teachers seem to have observed as a critical litmus test upon which they felt compelled to opine. That topic, and one that merits serious contemplation by today's global executive leaders, is the matter of fear.

Understand the role that fear plays

Sure, we're all familiar with the words attributed to United States President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who said, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

But there is a striking focus on the part of some of the most revered leaders from a great many walks of professional life on the topic of fear that suggests – particularly in the COVID-19 dominated environment in which we all operate today – that we would all be better served to understand the role that fear plays in our daily life, our identity and our interaction with others.

The truth, in the opinion of many of the world's most historically significant leaders, is that fear is holding us back from achieving all that we are capable of realising, in our workplaces, our homes and our relationships.

It is also likely holding back our employees and our organisations, as an extension of the fear-based decision making of those with authority. Just consider these interesting observations about fear:

  • Fear means, Forget Everything And Run, or Face Everything And Rise
  • Fear is: False Evidence Appearing Real
  • The fears we don't face become our limits
  • And, this, a quote from American author Jack Canfield: "Everything you want is on the other side of fear."

Understand fear better

As one considers the existence of fear as part of everyday humanity, and the need to overcome it to achieve maximum human and organisational performance, it is striking that so many leaders who have come before us have focused so consistently on fear as an obstacle to success.

Yet as we consider the drivers and consequences of fear, we must also realise its duplicitous nature. Many of the most admired global business leaders have admitted that, particularly in their formative years and even more consistently for those who grew up from hardscrabble childhoods, fear was both a constant companion and catalyst to the very actions and habits they created to achieve greatness.

Maybe this is why fear itself is so big a challenge for global executive leaders to figure out. On the one hand, fear motivates action. On the other, it also denies us from the future we could achieve.

For these reasons, consider this a call for you to consider the influence of fear on how you behave, how you lead, what you say and how you interact with others. You may just find that fears are holding you back, and if not, all the more time for you to help others acknowledge and address their own fears.

After all, the more fears are holding back others, the bigger the impediments to their success and fulfilment, and in part, our own.

So, examine your own life to understand fear better. Once you do, you may find your mastery of fear and the development of individual fortitude can help you get to where you're going, faster and perhaps more confidently than ever before.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Holding Firm In The Storm, Aligning For The Future
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Now more than ever before, leadership in any business management function beckons leaders to lead.

These are the times that test the relationships we, as leaders, have built with employees, with peers and business partners. Everything we put into these will now be summoned as people look for trust and support in others in trying times.

Read "Holding Firm In The Storm, Aligning For The Future" leadership insights

Creating An Environment For Innovation

What is holding you back?

Charles Darwin is long remembered for informing us, based on years of study as a naturalist and biologist, that it is not the strongest of the species that survives, but rather, the one most adaptable to change.

At least partly for this reason, business owners and global executive leaders rather predictably call for significant innovation when crafting their annual business growth plans.

Be this innovation grounded in expected technological advances, market research, organisational restructuring or hefty financial investment, the linkage between better results and doing something new or perhaps even bold has never been stronger.

There are, after all, a great many examples of people and enterprises taking small ideas and changing the world, along the way enriching themselves and their stakeholders. That's the kind of result the Chief Executive Officer wants to realise, and no doubt, you and your teams as well.

And there are likewise many business tales about the cost of standing still, of watching customers and markets change around them, and ultimately, realising it's simply too late to save the company.

So, if your company's greatest potential for innovation hasn't yet been realised, what's been holding it back?

That is a serious question worth asking and worth exploring until one can gain some answers particularly if you and your team have been tasked with ideating the next big thing for your enterprise.

For in order to innovate, one must operate in an environment where such exploration and risk is encouraged and rewarded. Further, one must find the time and resources to commit intense study and focus to just one pursuit at a time when the pressure to multitask and deliver results on multiple projects remains.

The potential for great success

If one were to ask Darwin, today, about what to expect on the road to a true breakthrough, it may well be that setting up the dynamics and environment for innovation must indeed come before the great success. That is, there may be bureaucracy, internal politics and/or stubborn managers stuck in their old ways standing in the way of agility and change.

Darwin himself is also credited with this quote:

To kill an error is as good a service as, and sometimes even better than, the establishing of a new truth or fact!

Especially true in these times. The implication for today's global executive is that one must study whether the organisation has the ingredients, the environment, the culture and also the true resolve to innovate. Much like a scientist studying the natural world, one must assess whether the pre-conditions for life, or, in this case, for breakthrough discoveries that can revolutionise or accelerate the business are present or not.

By carefully considering the opportunities as well as the obstacles to innovation, one should be able to see the potential for great success more clearly. This improved vision could translate into a defined set of actions required to nurture experimentation.

If your mandate is to innovate, or to drive innovation, you would be well served to understand whether you have the people and the will to fight through organisational barriers. Otherwise, you might only realise that despite the rhetoric about change, your company only wants to keep spinning its old wheels.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Finding Your Real Allies In The Organisation

There are lots of different personality archetypes within today's modern, global corporations. Just be careful not to judge a book by its cover. Seasoned executives are continually being surprised, and in some cases, utterly humbled, by experiences that shattered their spot judgments and biases.

To accelerate the pace of change in any organisation, savvy global executives already know they must earn and enlist the support and trust of business colleagues and confidants whose internal influence is critical to moving in the direction of something new.

These are the people to whom others go for insight, guidance and support in good times and in bad. These are, very much, the unsung heroes of the organisation. They are the employees who go the extra mile, consistently, to ensure the trains run on time, that leaders project their best image to the rest of the organisation, and who work until the job is done.

They are the people who care most not only about what gets done, but how it gets done. They understand how the organisation defines right and wrong, and they challenge problems when they see them.

Odds are you already know who we're talking about here. You already know someone - a person on your team, or with whom you interact on business affairs from time to time - who qualifies as a real all-star. Someone who exhibits true example, work ethic, attitude and consistent commitment to excellence makes them memorable and admirable and must rank among your very best employees.

The people who define the culture of your organisation and who already wield the most social capital, because of who they are and how they treat others, are your best possible allies. Find a way to tap and align with their credibility, and you will be capable of realising the change you want to make.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Navigating To The Boardroom. Thriving When You Get There

The call to serve

For many global executives, an appointment to the corporate boardroom as a non-executive director marks the pinnacle, defining moment of their business careers. The call to serve in such a critical governance position is an invitation many accomplished leaders deserve, but few actually get to savour. It is, most often, the result of exceptional business performance, purposeful relationship building and career planning, and a reputation forged by hard work, commitment and a superb reputation.

Yet, the historic profile of a compelling board candidate - and a successful non-executive director - continues to morph into a far more complex and time-consuming role than ever before. The non-executive director's role is the subject of growing scrutiny by activist investors, the media and politicians alike. If getting to the boardroom isn't enough, thriving once you get there is a challenge only the most accomplished and determined global executives will realise.

Existential threats

The potentially existential threats to today's corporate boards - and the historic view of effective corporate governance - come in a variety of forms these days. These include:

  1. Bids by activist investors to gain access to the corporate proxy, essentially using it as a vehicle to nominate their own director candidates
  2. Mounting threats posed by cyber-security breaches, often targeting corporate records of customers' credit card and personal data, and exposing companies and their directors to damaging media headlines and extensive data recovery and other costs
  3. The increasingly complex nature of corporate finance, including the shell game of classifying corporate revenue under a variety of labels, leading to the obfuscation of the facts and confusion among directors
  4. Challenges related to effective CEO succession and compensation, which can turn from highly politicised, somewhat "untouchable" topics for sitting boards to an organisational crisis faster than most directors realise
  5. Being seen as disconnected from stakeholders.

Calls for reforms in corporate governance have moved some governments to legislate the composition of today's non-executive boards, reserving a required quota for female directors. Further, calls to diversify today's boards continue to mount and put those boards built purely on "the good 'ole boys club" under increasing pressure to seat new members who reflect the company's consumer base.

The rules of the game are changing

A stellar reputation, superb business acumen and experience, and exceptional relationships are still very much the same things that can take your executive career to the non-executive board. But the job description is changing. The non-executive's role has become a time-consuming responsibility, and one that requires an increasing amount of homework, independence and due diligence just to keep up with the pace of change and reform.

The human, interpersonal dynamics that shape the very function of today's boards remain critical to success in the boardroom. So, too, does the open-mindedness that moves that silent voice inside to remind you - either as a new director or a veteran of the boardroom - that the rules of the game are changing and those best able to adapt are the ones most likely to thrive in the future.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

The Importance Of Trust

Trust is an incredibly valuable business currency for today's global leaders. If you don't have it, you better get it - fast - because it can really slow your organisation down. If you do have it, the trust of employees in particular is something every manager should seek to deepen.

In today's global corporate environments, trust fosters employee engagement. Trust helps to create and solidify company culture. It gives everyone a reason to believe what they are doing really matters and who they are doing it for really does, too. A trusting bond between managers and their direct reports helps fuel effective communication. It helps both parties clear up ambiguity and get to the heart of important business matters.

Trust breaks down barriers. Trust enlists personal investment in the company's objectives. And trust makes it all worth doing, and doing well. Trust flows like a river where self-aware leaders go to quench their thirst and occasionally pour new waters into.

Yet, the reality for many global executives is that their companies may see - or continually fail to recognise - a trust deficit that prevents them and their employees from reaching their full potential. Just knowing there is a lack of trust in an organisation is a very informing starting point. Even the simplest of employee surveys on the matter of trust can uncover loads of actionable intelligence.

If you are operating in an environment where trust is running thin or present only among employees with a particularly gifted leader as their manager, it is indeed time to reflect on what workers must see to begin to believe again. Ask yourself, "What do workers need to see that will connect the promises you or the company has made to them to actual action on those same promises?". Or consider, "What would workers need to see or hear from me as a manager that would connect my own words and actions?" Or even, "What can I show them that will demonstrate a commitment to them?"

Trust isn't built overnight. And it surely isn't granted in bulk. Trust is a reflection of a worker's own experience with their manager, their colleagues, and others who collectively either represent what the company says it represents or simply fail to do that. Trust is an essential ingredient for business growth. If you can build trust among your employees, you will invariably build the resources to achieve great things. You may just be surprised, however, at just how quickly lots of little, seemingly minor interactions, promises and follow actions can get you where you want to go.

Trust in that journey, and you will probably earn more trust than you and your organisation have today.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Remote Work Brings Talent, Profits, Collaboration & Much More
linkedin.com

Remote work has proven to work well across the world. The following insights by Chris Swan explore practical ways your business can optimise virtualisation:

  • Global Pool Talent Means Greater Productivity & Profitability
  • Closing Offices = Cost Savings & Collaboration
  • Virtual-Savvy Leaders Must be Agile, Engaged, and Empathic
  • More Benefits for Businesses and Beyond

Read "Remote Work Brings Talent, Profits, Collaboration & Much More" leadership insights

The Challenge for Global Leaders and Learners

The challenge for global leaders and learners (those terms should almost be synonymous) is to learn how to adapt to changing business currents and how to selectively engage the experience and insights that have served us well in the past while embracing new knowledge and a new sense of open-mindedness for whatever comes next.

Part of this new playbook for professional and managerial growth is to make some well thought out investments in the next generation of leaders who may, sooner perhaps than you might have previously imagined, be successors to some of the most pivotal roles in your enterprise. Perhaps even yours!

You see, mentoring, encouraging and acting to promote promising younger stars in our modern-day, highly interconnected global organisations is not only part of the chemistry for future growth we need to achieve ambitious goals, but also the means through which we see business opportunities through a different lens and build the internal support for seizing them.

Insights from "Providing Opportunities for Next Generation Leaders".


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.