Bedford/TRANSEARCH Hybrid Workplace Whitepaper 2021
home.bedfordgroup.com

Remote work is here to stay. Wherever you fall on the Venn diagram of attitudes to the remote office, that much we can agree on.

Whether our instincts are to push back on it, lean into it, or dance around the edges — that cat is out of the bag. Going forward, every organisation will have to contend with at least one singular, intractable market reality — a workforce that knows just how much is achievable and sustainable from one end of a Zoom conference or Slack group.

Executive leaders are going to have to navigate this reality and accept that the right way forward may look like nothing we've ever seen before.

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Can Biotech Be A Diversity Leader?
bedfordgroup.com

It's been a big year for biotech. And that momentum shows little sign of abating. Competition for top-seeded executives and board members has been fierce, with compensation at this level reflecting the sector's hunger for talent.

The "Board and Executive Compensation in the Biotechnology Industry" report’s intelligence gets more interesting where diversity and gender parity in the sector is concerned – and some fascinating observations can be inferred from that information. What can we do better? Where do we start?

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Cultivating Diversity And Inclusivity In The Workplace

The pressure to increase diversity in the workplace continues to rise across sectors and is a prime focus for business leaders around the globe.

What is the difference between diversity and inclusion?

Diversity in the workplace encompasses many dimensions, including race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, disability and sexual orientation; it can also include differing personality characteristics, thinking styles, experiences and education levels.

Inclusion means that the organisational culture and practices make employees of diverse backgrounds feel welcome, accepted and treated equally.

Numerous studies have shown that cultivating diversity and inclusivity in the workplace makes good business sense. For example, McKinsey’s workplace diversity study, "Delivering Through Diversity", found that companies whose executive teams rank in the top 25% of racial and ethnic diversity are 33% more likely to reap financial returns above the national median for their industry. Diversity has also been shown to be a key driver of innovation, creativity and productivity.

Attracting and retaining top talent

Most importantly for HR professionals and recruiters, a diverse and inclusive workplace is crucial for attracting and retaining top talent. Candidates are drawn to diverse organisations because it signals that the employer values people's differences and treats their staff equally. When it comes to retention, a culture of inclusion will make top talent feel valued, heard and understood.

Diversity is particularly important to younger employees. A 2019 survey by U.S. consultancy John Zogby Strategies found that 51% of millennials and generation Z agree that a "fair representation of race, ethnicity and religion is paramount to creating the ideal workplace." Forty-eight percent of generation X (40-54) and 42% of baby boomers agree with that statement.

The path to diversity and inclusion

Companies that have invested in diversity and inclusion over the years are reaping the rewards. The path to diversity and inclusion starts with moving it from an HR initiative to a business strategy. While this strategy may look different at every company, the key elements are:

  • C-suite support.
  • Employee commitment and collaboration.
  • Improving diversity in recruitment.
  • Fostering inclusiveness in the workplace.

Creating a diverse and inclusive workplace is no easy feat but it's clear that this is the way forward. How you screen and source talent, conduct interviews and onboard new employees are all opportunities to integrate diversity into your processes. Put simply, the companies that do this well will outperform others as recognised workplaces of choice among top talent.

Adapted from "Leading the Charge for Diversity and Inclusion" by Frank Galati.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Everybody Wins When Managing Candidate Expectations

Human nature is restless. How many times have you questioned a recent purchase or even suffered from so-called buyers remorse? This is a natural occurrence and it more often than not happens to you in a professional capacity, for example: you join a company as a new addition to the executive team, but at the same time continue to consider offers from other companies.

Research has shown that very few new joiners are completely confident in their choice. It is such an important decision that many continue to study the market, hoping to confirm or deny the correctness of the decision made. It might be that they are confident in their choice and find the new company completely suitable, but they find that executive search consultants and companies are still approaching them. This is particularly the case if they were not a passive candidate, but were actively looking for a new challenge.

It is also true that the more interesting the opportunity the greater the likelihood that executives might be tempted to at least attend an exploratory conversation. The latter scenario is not unusual in itself, but when an executive continues to remain unconvinced that their new position is suited to them we have to consider how we could have addressed this situation before they actually joined.

There is also the possibility however that some candidates choose a position with the knowledge that it is unsuited to them. The last possibility is that after joining a candidate realises that the company culture just does not suit them or that the reality of the role is not how it was described.

Whatever the candidate's motivation might be, the cost of unsuitable hires is quite substantial; not to mention damaging for the executive in question.

In light of the above, the role of the Talent Manager and the executive search consultant, remains important in the hiring process. It is their responsibility to accurately manage the candidate's expectations and to determine their motivation at the interview phases. Once the candidate is onboard however a keen interest in their adjustment should be a priority - this could take the form of a formal induction programme, but it could also be a coach that familiarises the candidate with the ins and outs of the company.

As TRANSEARCH consultants we take pride in our commitment to the integration of the candidate and keep in regular contact with both parties for at least the first six months of employment. As a third party we are often able to act as mentors and external HR-experts, listening to claims and fears of candidates while understanding the needs and requirements of the client.

To discuss our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment find a TRANSEARCH consultant by expertise, region and country.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Sustainable Leadership: 5 Key Recommendations
sustainableleaders.wixsite.com

5 key recommendations from 53 Senior Executives for a successful journey towards sustainability asks:

  • What motivates small and large companies to strive for sustainable business models?
  • How do companies succeed in their sustainability journey?
  • How do leaders and Human Resources integrate sustainability in their strategy?

To explore these questions, a cross-sectional sample of 53 Senior Executives were interviewed from global companies, NGOs, and consulting firms. Drawn from the interviews are 5 key recommendations:

  • Deeply connect sustainability with your company's purpose
  • Embed sustainability in every strategic goal and boost its impact
  • Do not underestimate the whole transformation journey
  • Place collective intelligence and innovative collaboration models at the core of the transformation
  • Find the right engine to boost the transformation

Learn more about the recommendations.

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How Leadership & Seizing Opportunities Can Supercharge A Clean Economy Revolution
linkedin.com

Joe Biden has pledged to create 10 million new jobs in the clean economy and spend $2 trillion on clean energy and sustainable infrastructure by 2035.

For this unprecedented transformation to succeed, highly talented people and innovative companies in the power and renewable energy sectors will need to achieve extraordinary feats. John Ryan explores the keys to succeed.

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Story is Culture and Culture is Story

Tomorrow's successful leader will be someone who can slalom through the white water of unanticipated disruption and culture change. To that end, little is more important as a navigation aid than the organisation's story. That story has five essential building blocks:

1) Where are we headed?
2) What do we believe in?
3) What makes us special?
4) What is our brand promise?
5) How do we make a difference in people's lives?

Story is culture and culture is story. Yesterday, strategy informed culture. Moving forward, culture enables strategy. If you are not measuring culture ... you are not managing it.

Insights from "Speed of Learning: The Ultimate Competitive Advantage".


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.

Reinventing Risky Acquisitions
transearch.com

Could a new Chief Financial Officer help a global corporation re-invent several risky acquisitions and engage their regional teams in a new business strategy? The challenge was to find a CFO capable of partnering to turn-around the failing elements of the new portfolio and create a dynamic new corporate strategy all could buy into.

To find the right candidate our highly specialised consultants leveraged our proprietary TRANSEARCH Orxestra® Method, undertook extensive search effort, conducted a battery of behavioural interviews, and took each candidate on a deep dive regarding corporate culture and their ideas for stringing together multiple teams in a vision with shared values and commonly aligned business priorities.

This resulted in the appointment of a candidate we recruited from a larger, globally respected corporation who had offered a compelling capacity to turn things around in the region and a commitment to unify the cultures binding employees across many different countries.

Read the full case study to discover the impact of the hire and the client's perspective.

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Seven Surprises for New CEOs
hbr.org

Leadership is fickle. As you climb the corporate ladder your role changes. When you lead a department you are expected to give orders. People look for leadership. When you lead a division you are expected to empower middle management. People look for guidance. When you become the CEO of a company you become a servant leader. People look for inspiration. Reaching the pinnacle role of a CEO is every graduate's dream, but when you finally arrive you have too much to do, with too little time and too little information. Moreover, you become a public figure and vulnerable to critique. Not everybody wears the armor to withstand such forces.

The findings of Harvard Business Review published in 2004 still seem relevant in 2020. Here are 7 surprises that new CEOs discovered when entering office:

  1. You can't run the company
  2. Giving orders is very costly
  3. It is hard to know what is really going on
  4. You are always sending a message
  5. You are not the boss
  6. Pleasing shareholders is not the goal
  7. You are still only human

Published by Michael E. Porter, Jay W. Lorsch and Nitin Nohria
From the October 2004 Issue

Summary by Geo Wehry, Senior Partner at TRANSEARCH, originally published on LinkedIn here.

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If you are not fast, you are going to be last!

As the momentum of business both increases and accelerates, a culture where learning how to learn becomes a high priority. And it is not just learning fast at an individual or team level but building an environment where speed of learning becomes an organisation-wide competitive advantage.

Consider the questions below.

  1. What needs to change to be flat, fast, focused, flexible and fertile to new ideas?
  2. How will compelling metaphors be introduced to coaching discussions?
  3. What would it take to architect leadership workshops as 'learning how to learn and learning how to learn limited only by imagination'?
  4. In future meetings what are you going to do to change the patterns of play?
  5. Do you measure culture? When and how will you make that happen?
  6. How successful are you in displaying behaviour in line with who the customer strives to become?
  7. How is 'speed of learning' woven into hire and promotion decisions?

If you are not fast, you are going to be last!

Insights from 'Speed of Learning: The Ultimate Competitive Advantage' by John Burdett.


As passionate experts in the executive search and leadership consulting industry we build leadership teams for our clients every day. Learn more about TRANSEARCH International and our wide-ranging approach to leadership acquisition and management assessment.