Are You Suffering From Job Application And Burnout Syndrome?
bluesteps.com

It may sometimes be challenging to distinguish between being on a fool-hardy mission-impossible job search or a righteously tenacious fight against the odds in pursuit of an awesome executive opportunity.

Are you continuously spinning the job application wheel until you reach job search fatigue without getting anywhere? If so, you may be suffering from what Rainer Morita calls Job Application Burnout Syndrome (JABS).

This article sheds light on what it is and how to avoid or overcome JABS.

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Navigating To The Boardroom. Thriving When You Get There

For many global executives, an appointment to the corporate boardroom as a non-executive director marks the pinnacle, defining moment of their business careers. The call to serve in such a critical governance position is an invitation many accomplished leaders deserve, but few actually get to savour. It is, most often, the result of exceptional business performance, purposeful relationship building and career planning, and a reputation forged by hard work, commitment and a superb reputation.

Yet, the historic profile of a compelling board candidate - and a successful non-executive director - continues to morph into a far more complex and time-consuming role than ever before. The non-executive director's role is the subject of growing scrutiny by activist investors, the media and politicians alike. If getting to the boardroom isn't enough, thriving once you get there is a challenge only the most accomplished and determined global executives will realise.

The potentially existential threats to today's corporate boards - and the historic view of effective corporate governance - come in a variety of forms these days. These include:

  1. Bids by activist investors to gain access to the corporate proxy, essentially using it as a vehicle to nominate their own director candidates
  2. Mounting threats posed by cyber-security breaches, often targeting corporate records of customers' credit card and personal data, and exposing companies and their directors to damaging media headlines and extensive data recovery and other costs
  3. The increasingly complex nature of corporate finance, including the shell game of classifying corporate revenue under a variety of labels, leading to the obfuscation of the facts and confusion among directors
  4. Challenges related to effective CEO succession and compensation, which can turn from highly politicised, somewhat "untouchable" topics for sitting boards to an organisational crisis faster than most directors realise
  5. Being seen as disconnected from stakeholders.

Calls for reforms in corporate governance have moved some governments to legislate the composition of today's non-executive boards, reserving a required quota for female directors. Further, calls to diversify today's boards continue to mount and put those boards built purely on "the good 'ole boys club" under increasing pressure to seat new members who reflect the company's consumer base.

A stellar reputation, superb business acumen and experience, and exceptional relationships are still very much the same things that can take your executive career to the non-executive board. But the job description is changing. The non-executive's role has become a time-consuming responsibility, and one that requires an increasing amount of homework, independence and due diligence just to keep up with the pace of change and reform.

The human, interpersonal dynamics that shape the very function of today's boards remain critical to success in the boardroom. So, too, does the open-mindedness that moves that silent voice inside to remind you - either as a new director or a veteran of the boardroom - that the rules of the game are changing and those best able to adapt are the ones most likely to thrive in the future.

Making Sense Of The Road Ahead
transearch.com

It would be an understatement to observe that the COVID-19 global pandemic forced multinational organisations and their leaders to adjust sails and navigate around a series of unprecedented business challenges.

So comes the question of your preparedness, and that of your employer, for what comes next. "Making Sense Of The Road Ahead" focuses on the critical few elements of your business (and perhaps, your career) strategy to provide some much needed context for the decisions that may be coming your way in just a matter of months.

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Seed Your Re-invention

Losing a job or losing fit due to decline in an industry can be difficult, but these developments can also help seed your re-invention. Your severance pay can fuel this ambition, and you can use skills that perhaps were not necessary for your past role to leverage your future success. You get to decide how to strategize this and how to spin it. Change gives you the chance to see your experience, skill set and goals from a different vantage point. That’s empowering. Use the momentum.

When HR professionals are reviewing materials to assess potential fit, they look to see if you have experience enacting the functions they need. If they are looking for a PR specialist or a licensed mechanical engineer, they are likely to recruit candidates who have done the job. If the setting is different but the competencies are the same, that often bodes well for fit.

It may be a cultural shift, but you can tell the story of how being a change agent is a comfortable role for you, once you’re ready to embrace again.

Insights from "How To Transition Into A New Industry" by John Ryan.

The most trying of times tests the leadership mettle of individual executives like no other

The hard truth is that the most trying of times tests the leadership mettle of individual executives like no other. It is what we do, how we share tough messages and what we stand for that will etch the real culture of the organisation into the minds of others.

Learning who you are - and demonstrating what you stand for, and what you will stand against - is as important a virtue as they come. To know one's own potential, you must know where you will draw the line in good times and bad, and how you will conduct yourself so that others will be willing to follow you.

Insights from "Taking A Stand When Character Matters Most".